History Girls












Born in Knickerbocker, Texas around 1876 to a German mother and a Native American father, she met outlaws William Carver and Ben “The Tall Texan” Kilpatrick when she was just a teenager. 

Knickerbocker was a haven of outlaws and Laura’s own father was a bank robber, so it came as no surprise when the young girl followed a life of crime. When she was just 15 years-old she began a romance with Will Carver, who had been married to her aunt until she had recently died. Carver often worked with Black Jack Ketchum robbing trains before he moved on to Utah and hooked up with Butch Cassidy and the Wild Bunch, where Laura ultimately ended up too. 

Somewhere along the line, Laura transferred her affections to Ben Kilpatrick, who cast his lot with the Wild Bunch in 1898. Laurie Bullion often helped the gang by fencing goods and money for them and was known to the group as Della Rose and often called the “Rose of the Wild Bunch.”

Having taken part in several train robberies with the Wild Bunch, Kilpatrick and Bullion returned to Texas with William Carver, where Carver was ambushed and killed by lawmen on April 1, 1901. Bullion and Kilpatrick then fled to to St. Louis, Missouri, where they were arrested on November 8, 1901. Kilpatrick was found guilty of robbery and sentenced to 15 years in prison, while Laura was sentenced to five. 

After serving 3 1/2 years, Laura was released from the Missouri State Penitentiary at Jefferson City, Missouri, on September 19, 1905 and lived the last years of her life in Memphis, Tennessee, under the name of Freda Lincoln, making her way as a seamstress and a dressmaker. She passed away on December 2, 1961 and is buried in Memphis under a tombstone that reads, “Freda Bullion Lincoln—Laura Bullion—The Thorny Rose.” 

She never saw her lover Ben Kilpatrick again. Kilpatrick, on the other hand, was released from prison in June, 1911 and immediately returned to a life of crime. While trying to rob a Southern Pacific express near Sanderson, Texas , on March 13, March, 1912, he was killed with an ice mallet.

Source: Legends of America

Women’s History Magazine

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{November 25, 2009}   In the wild world

In the wild world
I would love you
without guilt
I would call you
trembling,
I would seduce you
with words,
eyes, hands, lips
careless as wind,
I would speak
all the names
of your hidden desires
and give them to you,
day after day
until you are breathless,
aching
and burning for my touch.


J.L. Stanley



{November 18, 2009}   Master Jack: Wake up and live

Life is one big road with lots of signs.
So when you riding through the ruts, don’t complicate your mind.
Flee from hate, mischief and jealousy.
Don’t bury your thoughts, put your vision to reality.
Wake Up and Live!

~ Bob Marley – Wake Up and Live ~

From: http://ping.fm/dmwpX



{November 18, 2009}  

Master Jack: Wake up and live http://ping.fm/kBnNz



{November 18, 2009}  

Master Jack: The Plague http://ping.fm/NxK4a



{November 18, 2009}   Master Jack: The Plague

Today we have the benefit of hindsight. We know, as fourteenth-century people suspected, that the mortality caused by the bubonic plague of the Black Death was the worst demographic disaster in the history of the world.

From: http://ping.fm/Hd5dN



{November 17, 2009}   Wake up and live

Life is one big road with lots of signs.
So when you riding through the ruts, don’t complicate your mind.
Flee from hate, mischief and jealousy.
Don’t bury your thoughts, put your vision to reality.
Wake Up and Live!

~ Bob Marley – Wake Up and Live  ~



{November 16, 2009}   The Plague

Today we have the benefit of hindsight. We know, as fourteenth-century people suspected, that the mortality caused by the bubonic plague of the Black Death was the worst demographic disaster in the history of the world. 

We also know that the mortality came to an end in the first outbreak soon after 1350; contemporaries could not have known this would happen – so far as they were concerned everyone might well die.


Some treated each day as if it were their last: moral and sexual codes were broken, while the marriage market was revitalised by those who had lost partners in the plague.


We also know that the plague returned regularly, first in 1361 and then in the 1370s and 1380s and, as an increasingly urban disease, right through until the Great Plague of 1665 in London. But by around 1670 it disappeared from England for over two centuries until a number of outbreaks occurred either side of 1900.


It was not until these modern outbreaks that the bacillus was identified and connection between rats and plague discovered. Despite all their best efforts people in the historic period had no remedy against the mysterious plague, except as 
Daniel Defoe put it, to run away from it.

Full Article



{November 12, 2009}   Guinevere

Geoffrey of Monmouth introduces Guinevere, “the loveliest woman in all the island” with her marriage to Arthur. He proudly states that she “descended from a noble family of Romans and reared in the household of Duke Cador” implying a fair match. Monmouth’s interests lie primarily in the legitimizing effect of Guinevere’s Roman blood.

Yet her ancestry earns no forgiveness when Guinevere breaks “the oath of her prior nuptials” by becoming queen to the usurping Modred. Earlier accounts, in accordance with the attitudes of the early Latin texts discussed above, assumed that

Guinevere accompanied the throne as Queen, as spoils to the victor. Monmouth, however, attributes her newfound allegiance not to her situation but to “unconscionable lust” (91). Rather than see Guinevere as a “mere pawn of political events,” Monmouth paints her as Modred’s accomplice.

Even before Chreitien introduced Lancelot, Guinevere’s reputation caught up with her. Just as she
finally became a noteworthy character, Guinevere shouldered some of the blame for the fall of Camelot through her betrayal of Arthur, continuing the Welsh tradition of her traitorous nature.

Source 

Women’s History Magazine



Buto was a cobra-goddess whose original home and cult center was in the Delta of the Nile at Per-Uatchit. In time she became a prominent protectress of all of Lower Egypt. As such she was routinely connected to the goddess of Upper Egypt, Nekhebet. Together, they appeared in many pieces of art as symbols of the Two Lands, a united Egypt.

Buto did not just protect Egypt, she also was an aggressive defender of the king. She was portrayed as the uraeusRe, and later the pharaohs’. Her hood is spread in a threatening position and she is ready to spit poison on all of the pharaoh’s enemies or burn them with her fiery glare. 

It is thought perhaps that her powers could be used against the pharaoh as well. Her bite may have been the deadly device used by Anubis at the appointed time of the pharaoh’s death. cobra first worn on the brow of Buto was a personification of the sun’s burning heat and she was called the “Lady of Heaven” and the queen of all of the gods. 

She was closely associated with Horus the Elder, who was the protector god of Lower Egypt. Also she was associated with Harpokrates (Horus the Younger); she protected him from Seth in the marshes of the Delta while Isis was searching for the body of Osiris.  

Buto was depicted in art as a woman wearing the uraeus or the Red Crown of Lower Egypt. She was shown carrying a papyrus stem around which was coiled a cobra. Sometimes she was shown as just a cobra coiled in a basket and wearing the crown of Lower Egypt.
Source

Women’s History Magazine



et cetera