History Girls











Henry VIII was King of England from 1509 – 1547. He is seen by many as the first Renaissance Prince of the country and had an avid interest in the finer things in life such as art, stylish clothes, literature and music. He wrote a number of songs, the most famous of which was called “Pastime with Good Company” (also known as “The Kings Ballad”), a folk song that was popular in England as well as on the continent.

From: http://ping.fm/36JmZ

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{February 27, 2011}   The French Constitution of 1793

French Kiss

The French Constitution of 1793, also known as the Montagnard Constitution, was put in place to bring civil liberties to the people and instigated the First Republic of the French Revolution. Though it was suspended a few months later in favor of “revolutionary government . . . until the peace” as a result of the ongoing conflicts, the democratic ideologies that it laid out were an inspiration to the development later forms of democratic government.

ON CITIZENSHIP

The following are admitted to exercise the rights of French citizenship:
Every man born and domiciled in France, fully twenty-one years of age;
Every foreigner, fully twenty-one years of age, who, domiciled in France for one year:
And lives there by his labor,
Or acquires property,
Or marries a French woman,
Or adopts a child,
Or supports an elderly person;
Finally, every foreigner who is considered by the legislative body to be deserving of being treated humanely.

The exercise of the rights of citizenship is lost:
By naturalization in a foreign country;
By the acceptance of offices or favors emanating from a government that is not of the people;
By sentencing with punishments that are dishonorable or strip the party of his civil rights, until rehabilitation.

The exercise of the rights of citizenship is suspended:
By status of indictment;
By sentencing in absentia, until such sentence is revoked.

Read more on The Primary Sourcebook



In his book, ‘De Excidio Britanniae’ or ‘Concerning the Ruin of Britain’ Gildas Bandonicus, a British monk denounces the evil ways of the Celtic people of his time. Written in the 540’s, it is by far the most comprehensive primary source from the time of the Anglo-Saxon invasion of Britain.

“Whatever in this my epistle I may write in my humble but well-meaning manner, rather by way of lamentation than for display, let no one suppose that it springs from contempt of others, or that I foolishly esteem myself as better than they; -for, alas! the subject of my complaint is the general destruction of every thing that is good, and the general growth of evil throughout the land;- but that I would condole with my country in her distress and rejoice to see her revive therefrom: for it is my present purpose to relate the deeds of an indolent and slothful race, rather than the exploits of those who have been valiant in the field…….

I revolved again and again in my amazed mind with compunction in my heart, and I thought to myself, “If God’s peculiar people, chosen from all the people of the world, the royal seed, and holy nation, to whom he had said, ‘My first begotten Israel,’ its priests, prophets, and kings, throughout many ages, his servant and apostle, and the members of his primitive church, were not spared when they deviated from the right path, what will he do to the darkness of this our age, in which, besides all the huge and heinous sins, which it has in common with all the wicked of the world committed, is found an innate, indelible, and irremediable load of folly and inconstancy?”

Read more on The Primary Sourcebook



Thomas Aquinas (c1224-75) is believed by many to be the most important Western philosopher of his time. Aquinas was a prolific writer and was reported at times to be able write two works at a time via dictation. One of his most important works, the ‘Summa Theologiae’ discusses many topics ranging from the existence of God to what is and is not a sin. In this extract, he discusses lust and explains why he believes lusting for sex is forbidden.

From: http://ping.fm/MXItD



Greek historian Plutarch wrote a two part essay on the virtues of Women called De Mulierum Virtutibus. Unfortunately the second and probably most important, in-depth part is now lost. The first part however is an intriguing series of brief descriptions of women from throughout the known world. Here he describes how the women of Miletus overcame a strange mental illness as a result of their virtue:

From: http://ping.fm/cakmW



Greek historian Plutarch wrote a two part essay on the virtues of Women called De Mulierum Virtutibus. Unfortunately the second and probably most important, in-depth part is now lost. The first part however is an intriguing series of brief descriptions of women from throughout the known world. Here he describes how the women of Miletus overcame a strange mental illness as a result of their virtue:

From: http://ping.fm/yUEOY



Sybil Ludington was the eldest of twelve children. Her father, Col. Ludington, had served in the French and Indian war. As a mill owner in Patterson, New York, he was a community leader, and he volunteered to serve as the local militia commander as war with the British loomed.

When he received word late on April 26, 1777, that the British were attacking Danbury, Connecticut, Colonel Ludington knew that they would move from there into further attacks in New York. As head of the local militia, he needed to muster his troops from their farmhouses around the distict, and to warn the people of the countryside of possible British attack.

From: http://ping.fm/DzHLP



{February 25, 2011}   Edutainment: Agincourt

His teenage life was extremely eventful. He became Prince of Wales at the age of 12, and by age 14 was already proving himself in battle fighting the forces of Owain Glyndwr, a Welsh rebel who was in favour of the Plantagenet kings, whose reign had been usurped by the young prince’s father, Henry IV.

At the tender age of 16 Henry commanded his father’s forces at the battle of Shrewsbury, establishing his reputation as a formidable soldier and a shrewd military tactician. History does not record whether he was troubled with acne and girl problems at this time!

From: http://ping.fm/hMCfz



{February 19, 2011}   Bram Stoker And Dracula

Bram Stoker’s Dracula was first offered for sale in London on May 26, 1897 and was apparently inspired by a nightmare involving a giant crab. Stoker, born in 1847, was very sick as a child and could not walk until the age of seven, a situation that some speculate may have had a psychological affect on his writing in later years.

From: http://ping.fm/MV3sn



Greek historian Plutarch wrote a two part essay on the virtues of Women called De Mulierum Virtutibus. Unfortunately the second and probably most important, in-depth part is now lost. The first part however is an intriguing series of brief descriptions of women from throughout the known world. Here he describes how the women of Miletus overcame a strange mental illness as a result of their virtue:

From: http://ping.fm/aqWug



et cetera