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Izanagi no Mikoto and Izanami no Mikoto
are two of the primary kami found in ancient Shinto mythology. The divine siblings are the deities of the terrestrial creation myth, whereby the lands and all the creatures that inhabit them came into being. Specifically, they are honored as the originators of the islands of Japan.

While they star in the same creation story and both play essential parts in the generation of beings, they also have different roles and responsibilities. The myth focuses on the things they create together, but it also allows each of the kami to have an individual role in the mythology.

The primordial deities in the sky who preceded the pair in existence ordered Izanagi and Izanami to go down to earth to make something useful of the vast terrestrial realm. But at that time there was still nothing down there to sustain them or even provide a platform for their creative mission. While standing on the floating bridge of heaven, the pair looked down upon the face of the earth and pondered whether or not a potential country was beneath them. Higher still above them, the primordial deities realized that there actually was no place for their emissaries to land, so they cast down to them a magnificent jeweled spear.

Izanagi thrust the jewel-spear of heaven down into the ocean and stirred. With a “curdle-curdle” sound, he stirred up the brine of the ocean, and when he lifted the spear the brine coagulated and dripped off. It soon hardened and formed the island of Onogoro (“spontaneously-congealing”) island in Japan. This mythical island, supposedly located somewhere off the northeastern coast of today’s Shikoku, became Izanagi’s and Izanami’s home.

Read More http://jedijack-his-story.blogspot.com/2010/06/izanagi-and-izanami-creators-of-japan.html

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When Axaiacatzin, King of Mexico, and other lords sent their daughters to King Nezahualpilli, for him to choose one to be his queen and lawful wife, whose son might succeed to the inheritance, she who had the highest claims among them, for nobility of birth and rank, was Chachiuhnenetzin, the young daughter of the Mexican King.

She had been brought up by the monarch in a seperate palace, with great pomp, and with numerous attendants, as became the daughter of so great a monarch. The number of servants attached to her household exceeded two thousand. Young as she was, she was exceedingly artful and vicious; so that, finding herslf alone, and seeing that her people feared her on account of her rank and importance, she began to give way to an unlimited indulgence of her power.

Whenever she saw a young man who pleased her fancy she gave secret orders that he should be brought to her, and shortly afterwards he would be put to death. She would then order a statue or effigy of his person to be made, and, adourning it with rich clothing, gold, and jewellry, place it in the apartment in which she lived. The number of staues of those whom she thus sacrificed was so great as to almost fill the room.

When the king came to visit her, and inquired respecting these statues, she answered that they were her gods; and he, knowing how strict the Mexicans were in the worship of their false dieties, believed her. But, as no inquity can be long committed with entire secrecy, she was finally found out in the manner……

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{June 14, 2010}   The Muses of Ancient Greece

The Muses were not only singers for Zeus and other gods; they also oversaw thought in all its forms: eloquence, persuasion, knowledge, history, mathematics, astronomy. 

Hesiod praises their services to humankind, claiming that they accompany kings and inspire them with the persuasive words necessary to settle argument and re-establish peace, and that they give monarchs the gift of gentleness which makes them popular.

A singer (thought of as a servant of the Muses) has only to celebrate the deeds of men of long ago or to sing of the gods, and anyone listening who is beset by troubles or sorrows will forget them instantly. The oldest song of the Muses is the one sung after the victory of the Olympians over the Titans to celebrate the birth of a new order.

The following list of Muses was accepted by those who lived during the classical period in Western history:

  • Calliope–The first of the muses in dignity, is the muse of heroic or epic poetry, and is often depicted holding a writing tablet.
  • Clio–The muse of history, represented with an open scroll of paper, a laurel wreath, and a trumpet.
  • Erato–The muse of love poetry, from whom comes the term “erotic.” She is often shown holding a lyre.
  • Euterpe–Muse of music or flutes (often playing flutes).
  • Melpomene–Represents tragedy. Most often depicted with a tragic mask and the cothurnus (a high shoe worn by tragic actors to increase their apparent stature).
  • Polymnia–Muse of sacred poetry, ceremonial song or sublime hymn, or the mimic art.
  • Terpsichore–Muse of dancing and choral song. She is often represented dancing with the lyre.
  • Thaleia–Muse of comedy, often shown with a comic mask.
  • Urania–The muse of astronomy, usually portrayed with a staff pointing to a celestial globe.

 The word “museum” originally meant a place connected with the Muses or the arts inspired by them.

Classical era Greeks and Romans understood history differently than do people in the modern era. Whereas Greco-Romans considered history more literally, as something to be remembered and aspired to, we tend to think of history as something that explains present circumstances and can be a valuable guide to the future. In that sense, in some ways the nobler aspects of the past can and should be emulated.

Source: Texas A & M University 
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Women’s History Magazine



{June 10, 2010}   Who Were the Amazons?

What is known of the actual Amazons within the Aegean is very little, and yet intrigue about a race of dominant warrior women in the bronze age has flourished from ancient times into the present. The obvious question asked by most scholars has been, “who were the Amazons, and did they actually exist?”.

Research into the Amazons is extremely limited and at times contradictory. There are numerous accounts of the origins of the Amazons, most concurring that the black sea region was their original settlement. To what extent the Amazons settled into the Black Sea region has not been fully ascertained. Some sources say they reached as far south as Libya, some to the Anatolia peninsula, others as far west as the Mongolian region of Eurasia.

These accounts are further conflicted by the later Greek accounts of the Amazons. According to the Greek accounts, when the Greeks themselves began to settle into the area of the black sea, they found no Amazons.

As a result and to explain this discrepancy, the myth of Hercules and Hippolyte was created to explain their disappearance. According to the myth, Hercules led an expedition through the Amazon land to obtain the girdle of Queen Hippolyte (the queen of the Amazons), during this time he managed to expel and conquer all the Amazons in the district.

Regardless of the myth, modern and ancient scholars remain perplexed by the question of whether the Amazons existed at all. Plutarch, a Greek historian, concluded that the Amazons did not exist as a race of warrior women per se’, but were merely women fighting alongside men in battle. Herodotus, another Greek historian, believed that the Amazons did exist within Greece.

Other scholars have even ventured that the women were in fact male Persian soldiers who shaved their beards off and dressed as women in battle. These theories and questions have been compounded by the view of Amazons within Greek art. The early depictions of Amazons were similar in style and likeness of Athena, as time progressed Amazons were given the likeness of Artemis. The final depictions of Amazons share slightly Persian features, a likeness (since the Greeks were in constant conflict with Persia) which can be best viewed as anomalous.

Outside of the questions of the Amazon origins, other questions pertaining to Amazons concern their view of men, and if they were a fierce (blood thirsty) people. The Greeks often questioned (as do modern scholars) how the Amazons, a race composed entirely of women, were able to sustain themselves throughout the generations.

The most credible theory holds that the Amazons had contact with men from other lands, the Amazons kept the female children born to them, and sent the male children to live with their fathers. As to the Amazons blood thirsty nature, Quintus Smyrnaeus wrote of them during the Trojan Wars:

“In the pure rapture of triumph the Amazons charged, and with anguished groans and shrieks the Greeks perished, their manhood withered by the women from the fierce and untamed northlands. Like Goddesses amidst earth born heroes the Amazons pursued their reeling foes, dashed them down, cut them apart, and, scoffing, tossed them through the air – till the Greek formations dissolved in consternation.”

The Amazons by and large were a race of fierce warriors, who on numerous occasions laid siege in Attica, and were even a threat to Athens. What is certain is that the Amazons were formidable fighters which the Greeks feared, but as to the Amazons being blood thirsty the question still remains.

Source: mnsu.edu 
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Women’s History Magazine



Izanagi no Mikoto and Izanami no Mikoto are two of the primary kami found in ancient Shinto mythology. The divine siblings are the deities of the terrestrial creation myth, whereby the lands and all the creatures that inhabit them came into being. Specifically, they are honored as the originators of the islands of Japan. 

While they star in the same creation story and both play essential parts in the generation of beings, they also have different roles and responsibilities. The myth focuses on the things they create together, but it also allows each of the kami to have an individual role in the mythology.


The primordial deities in the sky who preceded the pair in existence ordered Izanagi and Izanami to go down to earth to make something useful of the vast terrestrial realm. But at that time there was still nothing down there to sustain them or even provide a platform for their creative mission. While standing on the floating bridge of heaven, the pair looked down upon the face of the earth and pondered whether or not a potential country was beneath them. Higher still above them, the primordial deities realized that there actually was no place for their emissaries to land, so they cast down to them a magnificent jeweled spear. 

Izanagi thrust the jewel-spear of heaven down into the ocean and stirred. With a “curdle-curdle” sound, he stirred up the brine of the ocean, and when he lifted the spear the brine coagulated and dripped off. It soon hardened and formed the island of Onogoro (“spontaneously-congealing”) island in Japan. This mythical island, supposedly located somewhere off the northeastern coast of today’s Shikoku, became Izanagi’s and Izanami’s home.


After settling down in Onogoro, Izanagi invited Izanami to describe how her body was formed. She said, “My body in its thriving grows, but there is one part that does not grow together.” Izanagi replied, “My body in its thriving also grows, but there is one part that grows in excess. Therefore, would it not seem proper that I should introduce the part of my body in excess into the part of your body that does not grow together, and so procreate territories?” Izanami said, “It would be well”.


Izanagi and Izanami proceeded to perform a marriage ritual in which they walked around a pillar, he moving to the left and she to the right. When they met on the other side, Izanami spoke first, saying: “Ah! What a fair and lovely youth!” To which Izanagi replied: “Ah! What a fair and lovely maiden!” 

Despite the gracious exchange of words, however, Izanagi was concerned about a perceived lapse in the appropriate etiquette. In the Nihongi version of the narrative, he said, “I am a man, and by right should have spoken first. How is it that on the contrary thou, a woman, shouldst have been the first to speak?”. Nevertheless, they then consummated their relationship. Soon after, Izanami gave birth to a loathsome leech child, which the disgusted parents sent off in a basket into the ocean.


Izanagi was convinced that their first child was not a success because of Izanami’s breach of proper decorum. The divine couple conferred with the Heavenly Kami above, who performed divination and confirmed that this failure was indeed because Izanami had spoken first. The creator kami then had to return to the central pillar on the island of Onogoro and repeat the marriage ceremony. This time Izanagi began, saying, “Ah! What a fair and lovely maiden!” To which Izanami appropriately replied, “Ah! What a fair and lovely youth!” After this new exchange Izanagi and Izanami united once again and gave birth to a total of fourteen islands and thirty-five kami.


During the birthing of Kagu-Tsuchi-no-Kami, the fire god, Izanami was so badly burned that she took sick and eventually stopped moving. This was the first instance of death in the history of the universe.

Read more:        uwec.edu
Image Source:   picforme 

Women’s History Magazine



~ Der Vampir ~


My dear young maiden clingeth
Unbending, fast and firm
To all the long-held teaching
Of a mother ever true;
As in vampires unmortal 5
Folk on the Theyse’s portal
Heyduck-like do believe.
But my Christine thou dost dally,
And wilt my loving parry
Till I myself avenging
To a vampire’s health a-drinking
Him toast in pale tockay.

And as softly thou art sleeping
To thee shall I come creeping
And thy life’s blood drain away.
And so shalt thou be trembling
For thus shall I be kissing
And death’s threshold thou’ it be crossing
With fear, in my cold arms.
And last shall I thee question
Compared to such instruction
What are a mother’s charms?

By Heinrich August Ossenfelder (1748)



Once upon a time there was a young man who was engaged to marry a pretty girl. After a while the bridegroom-to-be became suspicious of his fiancée and her mother. You see, they were both witches.

The day came when witches go the Brocken, and the two women climbed into the hayloft, took a small glass, drank from it, and suddenly disappeared. The bridegroom-to-be, who had sneaked after them and observed them, was tempted to take a swallow from the glass. He picked it up and sipped a little from it, and suddenly he was on the Brocken, where he saw how his fiancée and her mother were carrying on with the witches, who were dancing around the devil, who was standing in their midst.

After the dance was ended, the devil commanded everyone to take her glass and drink, and immediately afterward they all flew off in the four directions of the wind. The bridegroom-to-be, however, stood there all soul alone on the Brocken, and freezing, for it was a cold night. He hadn’t brought a glass with him, so he had to return on foot.

After a long, difficult hike he finally came to his fiancée’s. However, she was very angry, and her mother scolded him as well, for having drunk from the glass. Mother and daughter finally agreed to turn the bridegroom-to-be into a donkey, and that is what happened.

The poor bridegroom-to-be was now a donkey, and he plodded unhappily from one house to the next, crying a sad “ee-ah, ee-ah.” A man felt sorry for the donkey, took him into his stall, and gave him some hay. But understandably the donkey did not want to eat, and was driven from the stall with blows.

After wandering about for a long time, long-ears finally came back to the house of his fiancée, the witch, and he cried out pitifully. The fiancée saw her former bridegroom-to-be, standing there before her door as a donkey with bowed head and ears hanging down.

She regretted what she had done and said to the donkey, “I will help you, but you must do what I tell you. At a child’s baptism, place yourself before the church door and let the baptismal water be poured over your back, and then you will be transformed back into a human.”

The donkey followed his fiancée’s advice. The next Sunday, a child was baptized, and the donkey placed himself before the church door. When the baptismal service was over, the sexton wanted to pour out the baptismal water, but the donkey was standing in his way.

“Go on, you old donkey!” said the sexton, but the donkey did not yield. Then the sexton became angry and poured the water over the animal’s back. Now the donkey was redeemed and was transformed back into a man. He hurried to his fiancee, married her, and lived happily with her from that time forth.

More witch legends at pitt.edu



In Hungarian mythology the goddess Boldog Asszony is the goddess associated with birth, fertility and harvests. She has been incorporated into Hungarian Catholicism, there are 7 goddesses known to be called by a generic title Boldog Asszony. One of these is called Nagy Boldogaszony, who is also the mother of the rest of them. They are associated with the following;
  • the giver and protector of life and the family. 
  • healing and herbes
  • bountifull harvest, fruitgrafting and harvest time
  • fertility of man, animal and plants
  • selection of brides and mates for man.
There are several hollidays associated with her which also strongly link her with agriculture, such as; “gyümölcsolto”; fruit grafting on May 25th, sarlos; sicle March 25th. Her other titles are linked with families but are now unused and Szülö; birthing, which is at December 26th and is only for families. 
As the religious head of the country “Magyarország Nagyasszonya”,  the great queen of Hungary was celebrated on October 17th, while Small/Young Boldogasszony day was September 8th. A few holydays are of Christian origin probably like “candle sanctifying” or ” Mount Karmel” Boldogasszony days. It should be assumed that Christianity probably change the general message and form of her traditional worship from the old one.

Her day in the week was Tuesday, it was also associated with taboos against washing (clothes) and dirtying water. Even during the time of St Steven in the 11th century St Gellért who converted Hungarians to western Christianity wrote that Bodog asszony was already being associated by the church with Mary the mother of Christ, and was also called the queen of Hungary, and the world. I believe that this association of Boldog Asszony, was not done at first in central Europe but was already practiced in eastern Christianity before the resetlement to Hungary. This based on the mentioning of “Budux” by the Syrian Christian documents.

In looking for a similar goddess in the past researchers have progressed through several Near Eastern fertility goddesses like Astarte, then the Sumerian Inana, but ultimately went even further to find the old Sumerian goddess BA-Ú as the ideal equivalent of BO-DOG ASSZONY in both name and in function. 
She also seems to have links with the early preliterate MAA cults of early Anatolia, which was the source of the agricultural revolution which spread into both Europe and Central Asia, resulting in the various clay figurines of ancient fertility goddesses found in both Central Europe and Anatolia.
Source: cwnet.com

Women’s History Magazine



Cuba is a Roman Goddess of Children Who watches over children in their beds, blessing them as they sleep. Her name derives from the Latin verb cuba, which has the primary sense of “lying down”, and is usually taken to mean “to rest or sleep” or “to be in bed”; it is related to the word cubiculum, “bedroom” or “bed”.

As Her sister Goddess Cunina is specifically concerned with infants in cradles, it would seem that Cuba is in charge of protecting young children who have graduated to using a bed and who are no longer infants.

She is associated with other protective Goddesses of childhood such as Educa, who blesses children’s food, and Potina, who blesses their drink; and She is said to be the sister to both Cunina and Rumina, the Goddess of Breastfeeding. The fact that there are several minor Goddesses dedicated to specific issues of childhood is not a sign of the triviality or absurdity of ancient pagan thinking (as St. Augustine would have it) but rather an indication of what a precarious time childhood in the ancient world could be, before the days of vaccinations and antibiotics when more than one in four children did not live through their first year.

Another meaning of cuba is “to be [lying down because one is] sick” or even “to be [lying down because one is] dead”, and it is likely that Cuba was also prayed to to help sick children get well (which does usually involve a lot of rest) and to avoid death. Perhaps then Cuba is not just a guardian angel-type Who protects children as they sleep, but a healer Goddess Who helps sick children get better through the powers of bed-rest and sleep. Cuba is sometimes linked with Juno, either as an aspect of that Goddess or as one of Her associates; Juno, as the Roman Mother-Goddess, was especially concerned with childbirth and healthy children.

Source: Obscure Goddess Online Directory

Women’s History Magazine



De Umbrarum Regis Novum Portis (Door to the Kingdom
of Shadows), published by Aristide Torchia, is based on
the Delomelanicon, written by the devil herself.

For publishing this book, Aristide Torchia was committed
to flames by the Holy Inquisition on Campo dei Fiori in
the Year of Our Lord 1666, together with the printed copies
De Umbrarum Regis.

There are only three, recently discovered copies
of this book.
Delomelanicon
Summon the
Princess of Darkness
Gr. δηλοω, to summon,
and μελας, black, dark.
To summon the devil, arrange the engravings
in the
Delomelanicon into the correct order
and decode the message hidden in the Umbrarum
 Regis Novum Portis. However, to do that,
 you have to learn Latin first.
Click here to learn latin and summon the devil!!


et cetera