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Izanagi no Mikoto and Izanami no Mikoto
are two of the primary kami found in ancient Shinto mythology. The divine siblings are the deities of the terrestrial creation myth, whereby the lands and all the creatures that inhabit them came into being. Specifically, they are honored as the originators of the islands of Japan.

While they star in the same creation story and both play essential parts in the generation of beings, they also have different roles and responsibilities. The myth focuses on the things they create together, but it also allows each of the kami to have an individual role in the mythology.

The primordial deities in the sky who preceded the pair in existence ordered Izanagi and Izanami to go down to earth to make something useful of the vast terrestrial realm. But at that time there was still nothing down there to sustain them or even provide a platform for their creative mission. While standing on the floating bridge of heaven, the pair looked down upon the face of the earth and pondered whether or not a potential country was beneath them. Higher still above them, the primordial deities realized that there actually was no place for their emissaries to land, so they cast down to them a magnificent jeweled spear.

Izanagi thrust the jewel-spear of heaven down into the ocean and stirred. With a “curdle-curdle” sound, he stirred up the brine of the ocean, and when he lifted the spear the brine coagulated and dripped off. It soon hardened and formed the island of Onogoro (“spontaneously-congealing”) island in Japan. This mythical island, supposedly located somewhere off the northeastern coast of today’s Shikoku, became Izanagi’s and Izanami’s home.

Read More http://jedijack-his-story.blogspot.com/2010/06/izanagi-and-izanami-creators-of-japan.html

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  • The afflicted person makes a complaint to the Magistrate about a suspected witch. The complaint is sometimes made through a third person.

  • The Magistrate issues a warrant for the arrest of the accused person.

  • The accused person is taken into custody and examained by two or more Magistrates. If, after listening to testimony, the Magistrate believes that the accused person is probably guilty, the accused is sent to jail for possible reexamination and to await trial.

  • The case is presented to the Grand Jury. Depositions relating to the guilt or innocence of the accused are entered into evidence.

  • If the accused is indicted by the Grand Jury, he or she is tried before the Court of Oyer and Terminer. A jury, instructed by the Court, decides the defendant’s guilt.

  • The convicted defendant receives his or her sentence from the Court. In each case at Salem, the convicted defendant was sentenced to be hanged on a specified date.

  • The Sheriff and his deputies carry out the sentence of death on the specified date.

Source:  umkc.edu



Izanagi no Mikoto and Izanami no Mikoto are two of the primary kami found in ancient Shinto mythology. The divine siblings are the deities of the terrestrial creation myth, whereby the lands and all the creatures that inhabit them came into being. Specifically, they are honored as the originators of the islands of Japan. 

While they star in the same creation story and both play essential parts in the generation of beings, they also have different roles and responsibilities. The myth focuses on the things they create together, but it also allows each of the kami to have an individual role in the mythology.


The primordial deities in the sky who preceded the pair in existence ordered Izanagi and Izanami to go down to earth to make something useful of the vast terrestrial realm. But at that time there was still nothing down there to sustain them or even provide a platform for their creative mission. While standing on the floating bridge of heaven, the pair looked down upon the face of the earth and pondered whether or not a potential country was beneath them. Higher still above them, the primordial deities realized that there actually was no place for their emissaries to land, so they cast down to them a magnificent jeweled spear. 

Izanagi thrust the jewel-spear of heaven down into the ocean and stirred. With a “curdle-curdle” sound, he stirred up the brine of the ocean, and when he lifted the spear the brine coagulated and dripped off. It soon hardened and formed the island of Onogoro (“spontaneously-congealing”) island in Japan. This mythical island, supposedly located somewhere off the northeastern coast of today’s Shikoku, became Izanagi’s and Izanami’s home.


After settling down in Onogoro, Izanagi invited Izanami to describe how her body was formed. She said, “My body in its thriving grows, but there is one part that does not grow together.” Izanagi replied, “My body in its thriving also grows, but there is one part that grows in excess. Therefore, would it not seem proper that I should introduce the part of my body in excess into the part of your body that does not grow together, and so procreate territories?” Izanami said, “It would be well”.


Izanagi and Izanami proceeded to perform a marriage ritual in which they walked around a pillar, he moving to the left and she to the right. When they met on the other side, Izanami spoke first, saying: “Ah! What a fair and lovely youth!” To which Izanagi replied: “Ah! What a fair and lovely maiden!” 

Despite the gracious exchange of words, however, Izanagi was concerned about a perceived lapse in the appropriate etiquette. In the Nihongi version of the narrative, he said, “I am a man, and by right should have spoken first. How is it that on the contrary thou, a woman, shouldst have been the first to speak?”. Nevertheless, they then consummated their relationship. Soon after, Izanami gave birth to a loathsome leech child, which the disgusted parents sent off in a basket into the ocean.


Izanagi was convinced that their first child was not a success because of Izanami’s breach of proper decorum. The divine couple conferred with the Heavenly Kami above, who performed divination and confirmed that this failure was indeed because Izanami had spoken first. The creator kami then had to return to the central pillar on the island of Onogoro and repeat the marriage ceremony. This time Izanagi began, saying, “Ah! What a fair and lovely maiden!” To which Izanami appropriately replied, “Ah! What a fair and lovely youth!” After this new exchange Izanagi and Izanami united once again and gave birth to a total of fourteen islands and thirty-five kami.


During the birthing of Kagu-Tsuchi-no-Kami, the fire god, Izanami was so badly burned that she took sick and eventually stopped moving. This was the first instance of death in the history of the universe.

Read more:        uwec.edu
Image Source:   picforme 

Women’s History Magazine



{May 30, 2010}   The Curse of the Ice Mummy

The death of a molecular biologist has fuelled speculation about a “curse” connected to an ancient corpse. Tom Loy, 63, had analysed DNA found on “Oetzi“, the Stone Age hunter whose remains were discovered in 1991.


Dr Loy died in unclear circumstances in Australia making him the seventh person connected with Oetzi to die. Colleagues and family of Dr Loy have rejected the notion that he was the victim of a “curse”.


It is not known how many people have worked on the Oetzi project – and whether the death rate is statistically high. The amateur climber who found Oetzi in 1991, Helmut Simon, was killed during an unexpected blizzard in the Alps in 2004, not far from the original find; His body was missing for eight days before it was located.


Within hours of Mr Simon’s funeral, the head of the mountain rescue team sent to find him died of a heart attack, aged 45 and apparently in good health.

Four other people associated with Oetzi have died, prompting rumours of a “mummy’s curse”:

  • Rainer Henn, 64, a forensic pathologist who handled the body. He was killed in a car crash the following year
  • Kurt Fritz, the mountaineer who led Dr Henn to the body. He was killed in an avalanche shortly after Dr Henn died
  • Rainer Holz, 47, a filmmaker who made a documentary about removing the body from its block of ice. He died of a brain tumour soon afterwards
  • Konrad Spindler, 66, an archaeologist who was a leading expert on the body. He died of complications related to multiple sclerosis. 

 Source: bbc.co.uk



Once upon a time there was a young man who was engaged to marry a pretty girl. After a while the bridegroom-to-be became suspicious of his fiancée and her mother. You see, they were both witches.

The day came when witches go the Brocken, and the two women climbed into the hayloft, took a small glass, drank from it, and suddenly disappeared. The bridegroom-to-be, who had sneaked after them and observed them, was tempted to take a swallow from the glass. He picked it up and sipped a little from it, and suddenly he was on the Brocken, where he saw how his fiancée and her mother were carrying on with the witches, who were dancing around the devil, who was standing in their midst.

After the dance was ended, the devil commanded everyone to take her glass and drink, and immediately afterward they all flew off in the four directions of the wind. The bridegroom-to-be, however, stood there all soul alone on the Brocken, and freezing, for it was a cold night. He hadn’t brought a glass with him, so he had to return on foot.

After a long, difficult hike he finally came to his fiancée’s. However, she was very angry, and her mother scolded him as well, for having drunk from the glass. Mother and daughter finally agreed to turn the bridegroom-to-be into a donkey, and that is what happened.

The poor bridegroom-to-be was now a donkey, and he plodded unhappily from one house to the next, crying a sad “ee-ah, ee-ah.” A man felt sorry for the donkey, took him into his stall, and gave him some hay. But understandably the donkey did not want to eat, and was driven from the stall with blows.

After wandering about for a long time, long-ears finally came back to the house of his fiancée, the witch, and he cried out pitifully. The fiancée saw her former bridegroom-to-be, standing there before her door as a donkey with bowed head and ears hanging down.

She regretted what she had done and said to the donkey, “I will help you, but you must do what I tell you. At a child’s baptism, place yourself before the church door and let the baptismal water be poured over your back, and then you will be transformed back into a human.”

The donkey followed his fiancée’s advice. The next Sunday, a child was baptized, and the donkey placed himself before the church door. When the baptismal service was over, the sexton wanted to pour out the baptismal water, but the donkey was standing in his way.

“Go on, you old donkey!” said the sexton, but the donkey did not yield. Then the sexton became angry and poured the water over the animal’s back. Now the donkey was redeemed and was transformed back into a man. He hurried to his fiancee, married her, and lived happily with her from that time forth.

More witch legends at pitt.edu



Near-death experiences are tricks of the mind triggered by an overload of carbon dioxide in the bloodstream, a new study suggests.


Many people who have recovered from life-threatening injuries have said they experienced their lives flashing before their eyes, saw bright lights, left their bodies, or encountered angels or dead loved ones. In the new study, researchers investigated whether different levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide—the main blood gases—play a role in the mysterious phenomenon.


The team studied 52 patients who had been admitted to three major hospitals and were eventually resuscitated. Eleven of the patients reported near-death experiences. During cardiac arrest and resuscitation, blood gases such as CO2 rise or fall because of the lack of circulation and breathing.


“We found that in those patients who experienced the phenomenon, blood carbon-dioxide levels were significantly higher than in those who did not,” said team member Zalika Klemenc-Ketis, of the University of Maribor in Slovenia.


Other factors, such a patient’s sex, age, or religious beliefs—or the time it took to revive them—had no bearing on whether the patients reported near-death experiences. The drugs used during initial treatment—a suggested explanation for near-death experiences after heart attacks—also didn’t seem to correlate with the sensations, according to the study authors.

Read more at National Geographic



De Umbrarum Regis Novum Portis (Door to the Kingdom
of Shadows), published by Aristide Torchia, is based on
the Delomelanicon, written by the devil herself.

For publishing this book, Aristide Torchia was committed
to flames by the Holy Inquisition on Campo dei Fiori in
the Year of Our Lord 1666, together with the printed copies
De Umbrarum Regis.

There are only three, recently discovered copies
of this book.
Delomelanicon
Summon the
Princess of Darkness
Gr. δηλοω, to summon,
and μελας, black, dark.
To summon the devil, arrange the engravings
in the
Delomelanicon into the correct order
and decode the message hidden in the Umbrarum
 Regis Novum Portis. However, to do that,
 you have to learn Latin first.
Click here to learn latin and summon the devil!!


{April 1, 2010}   Witches of Cornwall

Over the centuries, many in the British Isles have appealed to witches in times of need–to cure a toothache, concoct a love potion, or curse a neighbor. Witchcraft, the rituals of a number of pagan belief systems, was thought to offer control of the world through rites and incantations. 

Common as it has been over the past several centuries, the practice is secretive and there are few written records. It tends to be passed down through families and never revealed to outsiders. But archaeologist Jacqui Wood has unearthed evidence of more than 40 witchy rituals beneath her own front yard, bringing to light an unknown branch of witchcraft possibly still practiced today.

Wood’s home is in the hamlet of Saveock Water in Cornwall, a county tucked in the far southwest corner of the country. For thousands of years people have raised crops and livestock in its fertile valleys, and its coastline of dramatic cliffs, secluded coves, and pounding surf was once a haunt for smugglers. Cornwall is a place time forgot; steeped in folklore, myth, and legend; and purported to be inhabited by pixies, fairies, and elves. So it should come as no surprise that it has also been home to the dark arts….

1640, the time of civil war in England and a very dangerous period to be practicing witchcraft. “Any sort of pagan worship was classified as witchcraft at that time, and punishable by death,” says Wood. “If caught, they would have been burned at the stake.” To make things worse, swans were royal symbols and property of the crown, so killing a swan was doubly risky.


Witch trials were common during the 16th and 17th centuries, and sometimes a few whispers were enough to see someone hanged. “During the 1650s more than 25 people were sent to Launceston Gaol [prison], in Cornwall, after a woman was accused by her neighbors of being a witch. She promptly implicated others in her alleged practice of the dark arts, some of whom were executed,” says Jason Semmens, assistant curator at the Horsham Museum in Sussex and an expert on witchcraft in Cornwall during the 17th century.


And yet witchcraft remained popular, says Marion Gibson of Exeter University, a specialist on 16th- and 17th-century paganism. “Every village would have had people thought to be skilled in magic in one way or another and people in the area would go to them for their specialist services, just as we might go to a lawyer or plumber today.”

Read more

Women’s History Magazine



{October 27, 2009}   Billy’s Bar and Grill

Billy’s Bar and Grill was built in 1877 in Anoka, Minnesota. It was originally a hotel that had a restaurant and bar in it. After a fire swept through the Anoka area in 1884, and the building was severely damaged it was rebuilt and ready to open in 1885.

Shortly after reopening its doors and the first anniversary of the fire, the hotel had its first murder occur. A drunken disagreement between friends led to one man shooting the other.

In the 1920s the original owners turned it over to relatives and in 1952, the hotel was converted into apartments and stayed that way until 1975. The ownership changed hands a few times over the years and now just a bar and grill.

The place is haunted by a red haired woman that is believed to be a prostitute from the 1920s that disappeared while working in the hotel. She appears in a third floor window and is known to walk through the bar and grill.

There have been incidences when the pictures on the walls move and the lights turn on and off. There was one time when the beer cases shifted in the stock room to the point of blocking the door.

More Haunted Bars



{September 23, 2009}   Xara the zombie


Xara when living in the early 80s was practicing Santeria, she was from Nicaragua. Legend has it that she traveled to New Orleans to obtain various ointments and potions from a Voodoo priest. The Voodoo priest and Xara became entangled in an affair. When the Voodoo priest discovered that Xara was cheating on him with his own brother, he poisoned her with toxins from the puffer fish. With various rituals, he was able to turn her into a zombie.

Xara became a zombie prostitute on the streets on New Orleans. Her mind was under the complete control of the Voodoo priest turned pimp. Eventually the Voodoo priest released Xara and she returned to Biloxi. Xara was never the same again. She always seemed like she was in a daze.

The last time anyone saw Xara is when she was picked up by a trucker in a Mack truck. Xara was never seen or heard from again. Many people thought she was killed by a trucker serial killer.

One year later, Xara was seen walking the road side, staring blankly ahead and if you watched her long enough, she would dissipate into nothingness. It appears that Xara the Zombris is now a restless spirit, seeking out the man that snuffed out her life.

Full story



et cetera